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4834- Late Presentment

Mastercard Reason Code 4834 Late Presentment

Mastercard chargeback reason code 4834 is one of the numeric labels assigned by banks to each customer dispute, indicating the given reason for the claim. We say the given reason because it may or may not reflect the true reason.

Under certain circumstances, Mastercard may allow consumers to reverse a payment card transaction by filing a chargeback. Chargebacks were designed to be a “last-resort” for disagreements that cannot be resolved with the merchant. However, they’re more and more often used as a tool to commit fraud.

Reason code 4834 indicates the broad category “Point of Interaction Errors.” The code can be used in multiple specific situations, many of which had their own individual codes at one time. Late presentment chargebacks, for example, were formerly filed under legacy reason code 4842, which should no longer be used.

When necessary, an additional message will be provided along with the reason code to inform the merchant which particular type of chargeback applies to the claim. In claims featuring a 4834 reason code, one of the possible causes is “Late Presentment.”

Should Merchants Worry About Reason Code 4834 Chargebacks?

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What Is a Late Presentment Chargeback?

A chargeback with reason code 4834 may refer to disputes in which the merchant failed to present the transaction within the required timeframe. However, since that time, the cardholder’s account has been closed.

For a late presentment chargeback to be valid, the following conditions must apply:

  • The cardholder’s account must be permanently closed.
  • The issuer used good-faith efforts to collect the transaction amount from the cardholder.
  • The transaction was not presented within one of the stated time frames.

These time frames are defined as the time elapsed between the transaction date and the Central Site Business Date. When calculating the number of days, the original transaction date is considered “Day Zero.”

The timeframes themselves are more complicated. The acquirer has a certain number of days after the transaction in which to present the transaction to the issuer. The exact timeframe can vary considerably, though, depending on the conditions of the situation. Extenuating circumstances apply if the transaction in question:

  • Was completed with electronically-recorded card information: Whether the information was card-read or key-entered, the acquirer has a maximum of seven calendar days after the transaction date.
  • Was completed with manually-recorded card information: Whether the information was imprinted or handwritten, the acquirer has a maximum of 30 calendar days after the transaction date.
  • Involved a merchant located—and a card issued—in the US: If the transaction was completed with manually-recorded card information (whether imprinted or handwritten), the acquirer has a maximum of 14 calendar days after the transaction date.
  • Is a payment transaction: It must be presented in clearing within one business day of the authorization date.
  • Is a contactless transit aggregated transaction: The transaction must be presented in clearing within 14 calendar days of the authorization date.
  • Occurred on or after July 17, 2020: A refund transaction must be presented in clearing within five calendar days of the transaction date (Note: for a refund transaction, the transaction date is the date on which the merchant agreed to provide a refund to the cardholder. This is either the refund transaction receipt date, or the refund transaction authorization date in cases where the refund transaction was issuer-authorized).

The above timeframes notwithstanding, the acquirer has a maximum of 30 calendar days (14 calendar days for intra-United States transactions) after the transaction date to present a transaction, in cases where the acquirer must delay presentment.

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Late Presentment Disputes: Causes and Prevention

The good news is that Mastercard Reason Code 4834: late presentment chargebacks are totally the fault of the merchant. This means they are 100% preventable if the merchant implements some best practices:

  • Be sure to consistently request authorization before processing a transaction.
  • Send completed transactions to your card processor as soon as possible (preferably on the day of sale, or at least within one day).
  • Learn and adhere to the different time limits for different situations.
  • Train staff members on the above practices.

Vigilance and training are the keys to preventing this type of error.

Chargeback Prevention: A Wider View

While merchants can take many steps to help prevent legitimate claims, fraudulent chargebacks are another matter. Friendly fraud is post-transactional in nature, meaning there’s no sure way to identify it beforehand. Merchants can do everything “right,” yet still have a dispute filed against them.

It’s generally more efficient to take a proactive stance when it comes to chargeback management. However, a truly-effective strategy must encompass both preventing chargebacks and disputing cases of friendly fraud.

Chargebacks911® can help your business manage all aspects of chargeback reason codes, with proprietary technologies and experience-based expertise. Contact us today for a free ROI analysis to learn how much more you could save.


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